Parents' Effective Communication Skills: Bridging the Gap

Parents must take a few essential steps to communicate effectively with their children.

Judith Uusi-Hakimo

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Parents arguing in front of their child.
Photo by RODNAE Productions: https://www.pexels.com/photo/parents-arguing-in-front-of-a-child-6003561/

In any relationship, effective communication is vital. This is especially true when it comes to your relationships with your children. Unfortunately, many parents struggle with effective communication skills, often making relationships with their children sour.

However, it doesn't have to be this way. With practice and effort, you can learn how to communicate effectively with your children, bridging the gap and improving your relationships with them.

Effective communication between children and parents is essential for a healthy relationship. When communication breaks down – tension, conflict and resentment will arise.

As a result of poor communication, resolving disagreements can be difficult. Your children may feel you don't understand or care about them, while you may think they are not listening or respecting you. This can create tension and hostility in your family, damaging your relationship.

One of the many ways to communicate with your children is for you to set a good example. If you demonstrate respectful and effective communication habits, your children will likely follow suit.

Having different perspectives is one of the main reasons children and parents have difficulties communicating effectively. Parents often want what is best for their children, but sometimes their expectations and views may be too demanding or unrealistic for the children to meet. As a result, the children may feel frustrated and resentful towards the parents, leading to more tension in the relationship.

So, what are some tips for improving your communication skills with your children? Here are a few suggestions:

1. Make time for communication.

It's vital to set aside time specifically for talking with your children. This could be during…

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Judith Uusi-Hakimo

A Nurse by profession. A mother of three and a wife of one. A storyteller and an aspiring writer.